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20131202
20131210
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LINKTV 10
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
LINKTV
Dec 3, 2013 5:30am PST
no further than shanghai. that chinese city has ranked top in math, reading, and science among teenagers. a new global report says that east asian schools are at the top of academic excellence by tackling tough classrooms and abandoning rote learning. things were not so good for students in the united states. a 15-year-old there jailed in math and were average for reading and science. france is above average in reading and writing but has reading and math, now in 20 fifth place. we leave you with that. you are watching "france 24." >> i am joined on the set by mrs. rush -- -- what is making headlines this morning? >> we start with syria and the question of bashar al-assad. i will go straight away the independent newspaper in the u.k.. bashar al-plicated assad in war crimes. you can see the piece there. the u.n. is keeping full lists of suspected war criminals. the evidence -- until the evidence is requested for an incredible -- four a credible investigation. more broadly on the situation seery, it is a story not being covered as much as usual compared to the events on the ground. when th
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2013 2:00pm PST
the skyline of florence, he also systematized the science of perspective which was to dominate western pictorial space until the 20th century. in masaccio's fresco of the trinity-- probably constructed with brunelleschi's advice on architecture-- classical columns and a monumental barrel vault frame the figures of christ and god, the father. here is the interaction of painting, architecture, and the mathematical analysis of space that was unique to the florentine renaissance. 1n 1419, brunelleschi had begun the hospital of the innocente. it was the first orphanage in europe to be funded by public donations, and the architecture is a delicate blending of the roman and the romanesque. it was brunelleschi's architecture which the painter fra angelico depicted in his fresco of the annunciation, which awaits you at the top of the stairs of the monastery of san marco. fra angelico lived and worked here, decorating the monastery with scenes from the new testament-- scenes striking for their simplicity and serenity. inside the cells, the world seems to retreat, leaving a single image suspended
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2013 5:30am PST
.n.a. we have more on the discovery that's just been recognized by the academy of science. >> using hair cells to help the blind see again, for this french scientist, the goal behind a decade's work, just recognized by the academy of science. >> our laboratory's innovation has taken a hair, cultivated its cells, and reprogrammed those cells to form cornea cells. >> the corneas protects the iris and the pupil. it can be destroyed in an accident, by burns, or infection. in such cases, the eye goes opaque, causing blindness. nowadays scientists are able to repair the cornea with grafts from donors, like those in this container. 42,000 people are currently awaiting for a cornea trance plarnt around the world, however, the number of donors pales in comparison. but grafting corneas from hair cells could bridge this gap. the next step, human testing. >> well, up may know that french cooking has been distinguished with world cultural heritage status from the u.n., but it's no longer the only country. the u.n. has given japan's cuisine the same honor. it uses seasonal ingredients, unique taste, t
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 2:30pm PST
of his real science projects and he had $7,000 left -- what could we do on that tropical glacier for $7,000? and i remember telexing back and saying, "i think we can get there." the idea was to bring a drill from antarctica and fly this thing up to the summit, drill the core, put the cores in a helicopter, fly it out. this helicopter -- we'd be flying along at 19,000 feet, and it would just fall like a rock. i mean, it's clear air. and the pilot's eyes were big. i'm sure ours were, too. after two attempts, they said, "there's no way. we can't even get close to the ice cap." you just couldn't do it. so we failed in our mission to drill the ice field. and that's when we came up with the idea of solar power. the beauty of that is that they're panels. and you can put six panels to a horse, and you can transport your power supply to the edge of the ice, carry it up on the summit, assemble the array, and power your drill. turned out that that solar power was just beautiful. the fact is, we actually drilled not one but two cores to bedrock using that solar-powered drill. and we couldn't have c
LINKTV
Dec 2, 2013 2:00pm PST
research corporation and a white house science adviser. with respect to discovering more, geologists today believe that you can use tomographic techniques, which are similar to what is used in the catscanner for diagnosing disease, for searching in the earth for new deposits of material. there are many new exploration tools such as satellites. the impending exhaustion of energy and mineral supplies had been predicted before-- in 1908, 1944, 1952. by now many minerals should be extinct. none is. a major survival factor has been substitution between metals and between alternative forms of energy. such conservation will continue to prevent long-run shortages. besides, the earth's crust is 30 miles thick. we've barely scratched thsurf no wonder the doomsayers have been proved wrong. it seems unlikely that economic growth will stop because of too many people, too much pollution, too few resources. yet worldwide, there are vast differences between standards of living. in the next century, americans may accept lower growth rates as the rest of the world catches up. even though we've come to a slo
LINKTV
Dec 3, 2013 8:00am PST
. [laughter] yeah. around--yeah. okay. yeah. that's good. it's for science. [laughter] do it again. [makes sounds] [laughter] black and white. then 10 years later, in 1984, my good friends dave vasquez and craig dawson came into my classroom and videotaped the course again. and 12 of those ended up as the tapes distributed by addison-wesley. one of those, i would like to show you now, features my good friend paul robinson, who turns out to be the author of the laboratory manual to the conceptual physics program. let's drop in in that class. don't touch it now. don't touch it now. okay. you'll be harmed less if you touch it now. you can trust me. okay. here? okay, right there. that's right on. yeah. [laughter] oh, that's beautiful. stay holding it. okay. look this way. yeah, that's nice. oh, that is nice. that's fantastic. look, look, look, look. oh, that's nice. that's nice, very nice. okay. now, i tell you what? could we all hold hands today? yeah, okay, yes, yes. let's all hold hands. back here, john. right--that's it, right, just come here. let's--here we go, go on. okay. dave, get that
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2013 3:00pm PST
? no, they're often not, but the science and the knowledge is there. do they invariably have the art that a good, homey, family-medicine doctor will have? no. no. i don't take any pride in the fact that we haven't been able to get everybody to have a good bedside manner, but the science is there. and sometimes it's worthwhile to just gird your belt and accept a big academic medical center so you can get the best opinion you can. of course, i want to see diplomas on the wall, and, you know, i want to see that they've been published and all that sort of thing. but, to me, far more important is the doctor's ability to connect with me as a human being. the relationship between doctor and patient-- that human connection-- plays a role in the healing process that sometimes goes beyond degrees and scientific knowledge. marc shiffman: there are 11 residents down here at various levels of instruction, training, experience, and i try and convey to them how much of a privilege it is to practice medicine, how difficult it is to practice primary care medicine, and how much more difficult it is t
LINKTV
Dec 2, 2013 5:00am PST
this is no science fiction. he says the service could be technically ready in four to five years. but bezos adds that u.s. aviation authorities will need to drop regulations for unmanned aircraft before such a service could get off the ground. >>> fast food chains in japan are coming up with new menus to attract more customers and boost profits. those chains are trying to win price-cutting competition and overcome rising costs stemming from the yen's decline. a conveyor belt sushi chain is one of them. it has started serving coffee, unusual for japanese sushi restaurants. more than 300 restaurants in the chain across the country have installed coffee machines. in some of them, coffee is served on a conveyor belt just like sushi. they plan to add a new dish of boiled beef and vegetables to its menu this week. it's priced at around $6, which is among the highest priced dishes. it's cut its earnings forecast for this fiscal year. the company says it will introduce value added meals to turn the business around. that's all for now in business. i'll leave you with the market figures. >>> haiku are sho
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2013 8:00am PST
, yeah? here we go, gang. we do, by experiment, one of the beauties of science is you do by experiment, huh. you don't just do it all in your head. here we go. [makes noise] oh, oh, first of all, i should say this, you guys get the white again. let me put a reflector here. so all this beam energy goes down here, and this beam energy is gonna scatter off here, all right, okay? [makes noise] what color do you guys hear? blue. do you hear blue? you all get it? good. maydell, what color do you hear? white. yeah, she heard white. why did she hear the white? because she's standing right next to the-- that's right, honey-- some, some, filtering. she could have come right at her. it's a good thing you didn't have your eyes there. [laughter] oh, god, no, no, don't. let's get your ear in there. just get your ear, okay? you heard a white. isn't that true? okay. here we go. okay, like that. now, we are at sunset, gang. sunset, uh-huh, all right? air is thicker, huh? what color do you guys hear? blue. white. orange. yellow. [laughter] paul, would you pass out the q-tips? let me remind you, we got,
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 3:00pm PST
find something else out about them. keach: barbour's curiosity led him to the modern science of fingerprints where he discovered that with a large enough sample he might be able to discern the gender of the person who made the print. males have wider ridges. females have narrower ones. through trial and error, he devised a technique to make permanent molds of the fingerprints. from these he began to construct a sample. finally, an intriguing discovery -- direct evidence that one set of workers was being replaced by another. barbour: it appears that the early handmade figurines were made by females. after the establishment of apartment compounds in teotihuacan about 250 a.d., you get a shift to wider ridges on the late handmade figurines and the early moldmade figurines. so it appears that when you have the development of the apartment compound that males come into the industry. keach: so as the city grew, the figurine industry changed. initially worked by women, probably as part of their domestic duties, it became a separate full-time specialization performed by men. with men
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10